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The History of IWPCSG

From little acorns....

The beginning...

The idea of IWPCSG was born by a small group of men in 2011 who were travelling each day to QA hospital in Portsmouth for their treatment for prostate cancer.  During those difficult and worrisome times, this group recognised the huge benefit they gained from being in a group and being able to support each other at a vert difficult time in their lives.  They also recognised that future patients would undoubtedly also benefit from a similar level of support. In particular, their experience, knowledge and reassurance would help guide future patients.  The idea of IWPCSG was born!  

Who and How..

Details to follow...

The first small steps..

Details to follow...

How the group evolved..

Details to follow...

What do we do now..

IWPCSG continues to align itself with the vision of the founding group by continuing to support men who have been diagnosed with this terrible disease and to help them through the process of diagnosis, treatment and recovery.  Our medical experts in the NHS recogise that early diagnosis of prostate cancer significantly increases the chances of successful treatment and recovery.  For this reason, our group invests significant time and resources into raising awareness of the disease and encouraging Island men to regognise potential symptoms and get tested regularly.

The focus on PSA testing

The current trustees recognised that in addition to support for men recently diagnosed with prostate cancer and those undergoing and recovering from treatment, we needed to ensure men were diagnosed as early as possible.  Until such time as a national screening programme is in place (similar to that for breat and bowel cancer) the most effective method of ensuring men are checked and diagnosed with prostate cancer is to provide widespread access to PSA testing.  With the help of other Island groups, we now arrange several events in a calendar year with a target of testing around 1000 men.  Our experience has shown that this early diagnosis will save the life of 250 Island men each year.